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Labor Market Statistics - Occupational Employment Statistics

Oklahoma Wage Data in Excel Format      Updated October 2014

Wage and employment estimates in the Excel file for the State, the Balance of State (BOS), and Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSA) are from the Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) program and are official BLS data series.  Wage and employment estimates in the Excel file for Workforce Investments Areas (WIA) and Local Labor Market Areas (LLMA) are from Estimates Delivery System (EDS), which is known as the Oklahoma Wage Network (OWN).  

The wages in the file represent May 2013 estimates based on responses from six semiannual panels collected over a three-year period: May 2013, November 2012, May 2012, November 2011, May 2011, and November 2010.

 

Bureau of Labor Statistics Non-Standard Products Disclaimer: The Oklahoma Employment Security Commission has provided several extensions to the official OES data series (which have been developed in cooperation with the Bureau of Labor Statistics). These additional products have not been validated by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and are not, therefore, official BLS data series. The Oklahoma Employment Security Commission feels, though, that they provide additional information that is useful to the users of OESC's data.

 

The Major Groups are listed below with the exception of 55-0000 Military Occupation.  We do not currently collect data for this major group.

   11-0000  Management Occupations

   13-0000  Business and Financial Operations Occupations

   15-0000  Computer and Mathematical Occupations

   17-0000  Architecture and Engineering Occupations

   19-0000  Life, Physical, and Social Service Occupations

   21-0000  Community and Social Service Occupations

   23-0000  Legal Occupations

   25-0000  Education, Training, and Library Occupations

   27-0000  Arts, Design, Entertainment, Sports, and Media Occupations

   29-0000  Healthcare Practitioner and Technical Occupations

   31-0000  Healthcare Support Occupations

   33-0000  Protective Service Occupations

   35-0000  Food Preparation and Serving Related Occupations

   37-0000  Building and Grounds Cleaning and Maintenance Occupations

   39-0000  Personal Care and Service Occupations

   41-0000  Sales and Related Occupations

   43-0000  Office and Administrative Support Occupations

   45-0000  Fa rming, Fishing, and Forestry Occupations

   47-0000  Construction and Extraction Occupations

   49-0000  Installation, Maintenance, and Repair Occupations

   51-0000  Production Occupations

   53-0000  Transportation and Material Moving Occupations

   55-0000  Military Specific Occupations

 

The Occupational Employment and Wage Estimates consist of the following:

SOC Code Number: The Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) system's unique, six-digit (plus hyphen) numerical identifier for each occupation.  When the SOC code is a link, clicking on it leads to a page that contains the occupational definition and national cross-industry estimates.

Occupation Title: A descriptive title that corresponds to the SOC code.

Employment: The estimated total occupational employment (not including self-employed).

Employment RSE: The Relative Standard Error of the employment estimate, a measure of the reliability or precision of the employment estimate. The relative standard error is defined as the ratio of the standard error to the survey estimate. For example, a relative standard error of 10 percent implies that the standard error is one-tenth as large as the survey estimate.

Median Wage: The estimated 50th percentile of the distribution of wages based on data collected from employers in all industries; 50 percent of workers in an occupation earn less than the median wage, and 50 percent earn more than the median wage.

Mean Wage: The estimated total wages of an occupation divided by its estimated employment, i.e., the average wage.

Mean RSE: The relative standard error of the mean wage estimates, a measure of the reliability or precision of the mean wage estimates. The relative standard error is defined as the ratio of the standard error to the survey estimate. For example, a relative standard error of 10 percent implies that the standard error is one-tenth as large as the survey estimate.

Percentile Wage Estimates: A percentile wage estimate shows what percentage of workers in an occupation earn less than a given wage and what percentage earn more. For example, a 25th percentile wage of $15.00 indicates that 25 percent of workers (in a given occupation in a given area) earn less than $15.00; therefore 75 percent of workers earn more than $15.00.

 

Additional Notes:

Wages for the OES survey are straight-time, gross pay, exclusive of premium pay. Base rate; cost-of-living allowances; guaranteed pay; hazardous-duty pay; incentive pay, including commissions and production bonuses; and tips are included. Excluded are overtime pay, severance pay, shift differentials, nonproduction bonuses, employer cost for supplementary benefits, and tuition reimbursements.

OES receives wage rate data for the federal government, the U.S. Postal Service, and some state governments. For the remaining establishments, the OES survey collects wage data in 12 intervals. For each occupation, respondents are asked to report the number of employees paid within specific wage intervals. The intervals are defined both as hourly rates and the corresponding annual rates, where the annual rate for an occupation is calculated by multiplying the hourly wage rate by a typical work year of 2,080 hours. The responding establishments are instructed to report the hourly rate for part- time workers, and to report annual rates for occupations that are typically paid at an annual rate but do not work 2,080 hours per year, such as teachers, pilots, and flight attendants. Other workers, such as some entertainment workers, are paid hourly rates, but generally do not work 40 hours per week, year round. For these workers, only an hourly wage is reported.