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Frequently Asked Questions



Marijuana as medicine has been rejected by the American Medical Association, the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, the American Glaucoma Society, the American Academy of Ophthalmology, and the American Cancer Society. Not one American health association accepts marijuana as medicine. In fact, every new research project performed on marijuana smoking has resulted in new data supporting the need to keep this drug illegal. Even potentially deadly drugs like PCP, Methamphetamine and Cocaine have been found to hold some medical value and are used in limited medical situations. If there was a shred of credible evidence showing marijuana had legitimate medical value, it would have been legalized for medical treatment years ago. Groups pushing "marijuana as medicine" do not care about sick people. Don't let them fool you. They have an agenda. They know if marijuana is legalized as "medicine" it willl provide them with the legal loop hole to smoke pot whenever and whereever they want. Marijuana is not medicine. It is an addictive and destructive drug which has layed the foundation of today's global drug crisis.

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The National Clearinghouse for Drug and Alcohol Information has a catalog containing literature, posters, videos and other items for the public. You can reach them at 1-800-729-6686 or on their web site at http://www.health.org/

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The best place to start would be the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services. The telephone number is (405) 522-3866 or check out their web site at http://www.state.ok.us/~dmhsas/

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You can contact the Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs at 1-800-522-8031 or (405) 521-2885, or phone your local police or sheriff?s department for assistance. Also, the Association of Oklahoma Narcotic Enforcers has a drug hotline you can access on their web site at http://208.226.183.2/aone/

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Behavioral symptoms include, but are not limited to: sudden mood swings, personality changes, defensiveness, overly emotional, overly self-centered, tendency to manipulate, strained communications, withdrawal from family activities, changes in dress and friends, lack of self-discipline, lost interest in favorite activities, school problems. Physical symptoms include, but are not limited to: anxious behavior, change in appearance, fatigue, bloodshot eyes, dilated pupils, frequent colds, sore throat, coughing, chronically inflamed nostrils, runny nose, dizzy spells, stumbling, shaky hands and sudden gain or loss of weight.

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When farmers could do this in the early twentieth century in the U.S., no one did. If it is such a good idea, why aren't other countries around the world doing this? Even if Congress granted the supposed benefits of "hemp as fiber," the costs of such a program would still clearly outweight the benefits. It is clear that groups pushing for the legalization of "hemp for fiber" are simply looking for a loop hole in the law so they can legally grow and smoke marijuana. Don't be fooled!

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