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FOR RELEASE: March 10, 2003
CONTACT: Pamela Williams
Office of Communications
405/271-5601

Traumatic Brain Injury Symposium Scheduled March 13-14 in Oklahoma City

The Injury Prevention Service of the Oklahoma State Department of Health will host a forum this week, March 13-14, to investigate current practice and research in traumatic brain injuries (TBI) and efforts to improve care services for those living with a TBI.

Brain injuries are the most likely type of injuries to cause death or permanent disability. More than 3,600 cases of TBI were reported in Oklahoma in 2001. Of those cases, 25 percent of the persons died. An estimated 700 of those who survived a TBI in 2001 still faced immediate or lifetime effects resulting from their injury, including problems with cognition (concentration, memory, judgment, mood), physical abilities, sensory (including vision and hearing), and emotional difficulties.

The main causes of TBI in 2001 were falls, motor vehicle crashes, gunshot, and assault. Forty-seven percent of all falls occurred in persons 75 years and older. The magnitude of TBI could increase as a result of conflicts, terrorism and disasters.

The Envisioning the Traumatic Brain Injury Spectrum of Care in the Early 21st Century symposium will be held at the Westin Hotel, Plaza Ballroom, One North Broadway, in Oklahoma City. The program begins at 1 p.m. on Thursday, March 13, with a keynote address by former state Senator Kelly Haney followed by a series of presentations over the next one and one-half days from TBI experts practicing both in and out of state.

Health care professionals, persons with TBI and their families, agencies, and others committed to improving Oklahoma’s health care system for TBI are among the intended audience for this symposium.

There is no registration fee. For more information, call the Injury Prevention Service at 405/271-3430, or email rutha@health.state.ok.us .

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